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Inspirational Dreamers

Inspirational Dreamers
Blog Inspirational Dreamers October 16, 2015

Jenny Alexander

Jenny Alexander is a true Inspirational Dreamer- a prolific author and creative tutor who uses dreams in her writing practice and teaches creative dream-working for writers as well as more mainstream workshops on the art and craft of writing. Her first book was published in 1994 and since then she has written scores of fiction and non-fiction books for children and several for adults. Her adult books include two practical handbooks for writers, Writing in the House of Dreams and When a Writer Isn’t Writing: How to Beat Your Blocks, Be Published and Find Your Flow.

Do you remember any childhood dreams? If so, what’s the earliest?

When I was about five years old, I dreamt I was riding along my road on a horse-and-cart, on a sunny summer day. The horse was trotting happily, and the cart was full-to-overflowing with gold coins that jumped and jingled and sparkled in the sun. Everyone came out of their houses to wave as I went by. I liked that dream so much that I used to deliberately go back into it every night, as soon as I closed my eyes. It made me fall asleep with a smile on my face.

When did you first get interested in understanding your dreams? How did that unfold for you?

When I was in my second year of university I started having nightmares about killing myself, waking up at the point when I was about to put my finger in the light socket, or turn on the gas, or jump off a high building. One night I woke to find that I had indeed climbed out of my third-floor window in my sleep and was, as I’d been dreaming, standing on the ledge outside. I thought my dreams were trying to kill me. It didn’t occur to me that I could try to understand them until I went into therapy after my sister’s suicide, a few years later. I told the psychiatrist about the terrifying dreams I’d had and was still having, and he encouraged me to record them and bring them to our sessions.

How did dreams play a role in your life, whether in decision making or in healing?

Dreams have always played a huge role in my life. They provide depth and context for my waking experience, but I only interpret my dreams if the interpretation is obvious, and then it doesn’t feel like a process of interpretation so much as a conversation between close friends. Just as important to me is the opportunity dreams offer to go beyond waking life into a completely different and unrelated world, which can only happen when we let go of the idea of interpreting and treat them as experiences for the self, in exactly the same way as we treat the experiences of waking life.

If you could give one piece of advice to those who are just starting to listen to their dreams, what would it be?

Simply that. Listen. Be receptive. Observe. Don’t demand explanations and try to manipulate meanings. Be patient. Meaning will emerge naturally over time, as you begin to see how and where your dreams resonate with your waking experiences, as well as how and where they don’t.

Anything else you’d like to share about dreams?

Dreams are pure imaginative substance; if you can let go of looking for psychological explanations they can be an endless, vibrant source of inspiration and ideas for creative work.

 

You can reach Jenny through her website: www.jennyalexander.co.uk or her blog: www.writinginthehouseofdreams.com

Inspirational Dreamers
Inspirational Dreamers October 2, 2015

Gayle Delaney

Do you remember any childhood dreams? If so, what’s the earliest?

I know I had some, but I thought nothing of them. I thought dreams were nothing particularly of interest. I didn’t think evil of them, I just didn’t hear about dreams from anyone.

When did you first get interested in understanding your dreams? How did that unfold for you?

I was living in France and when visiting home, my boyfriend gave me Edgar Cayce’s book, The Sleeping Prophet. It wasn’t something I wanted to read but if you ask for a recommendation, you owe it to that person to read it. I read it and had a knockout dream that ended all my existential angst. I woke up from that and was no longer anxious about the meaning of life, social or spiritual enlightenment. I got enough to know that life is just fine and my job is to bring cheer in life. And that underlying the real pain and disgusting wretchedness of life is joy and beauty and it’s my job to work at that….I was convinced and liberated from worrying about the meaning of life. That was 1970. It was a very liberating dream! That dream was extraordinary. I had rosy cheeks for 3 weeks and that wasn’t typical for me! That’s what turned me on to dreams. After that dream, which needed no interpretation, I wondered how come our educational system doesn’t teach this? I knew nothing about it [dreams] and only read silly things about dreams.

How did dreams play a role in your life, whether in decision-making or in healing?

Yes, in every aspect of life! Career choice for one. I was going to go back to Princeton in fund-raising (I thought I should make a living). I had dream after dream telling me, “No, don’t do it!” When I said yes to the radio job (the first satellite radio show in Seattle) I had a dream that basically congratulated me for my decision.

In my relationships… Dreams helped me divorce. Dreams helped me get over my guilt at leaving a good man.

Dreams to help me [ice] skate better. On buying houses….not psychic dreams, but dreams that help me think better. My dreams have never given me a bum steer and I’ve used them tons in my life. But I only use them when it makes sense to me in waking. I have ignored dreams that said, “Absolutely don’t be in a relationship with this guy.” A wonderful man….But I decided on my own, in my own time…but the dream was right! And eventually they helped me through it.

They have helped me with diet, health, exercise…. My dreams have given me “B12 shots” Metaphorical energy –accelerating my perception of beauty and love.

If you could give one piece of advice to those who are just starting to listen to their dreams, what would it be?

Don’t let anyone tell you what your dream means. Don’t become a follower. Figure it out for yourself. (There are ways to do that.) Don’t follow other people’s (or other systems’ and theories’) interpretations. Find a way to know what it means that holds true in all your dreams and your waking consciousness. Learn to understand metaphor.

Dr. Delaney can be reached at www.smartdreams.net.

Inspirational Dreamers
Blog Inspirational Dreamers August 18, 2015

Inspirational Dreamers aren’t only famous dreamers or authors, but they are you and me! Even so, I find it fascinating to talk to authors who are passionate about dreaming, to hear their stories and trace the roots of their passion back to a key moment or dream. So in this way, we are ALL “Inspirational Dreamers” who can share our dream stories! When I launched my blog on Facebook, I asked prominent dreamers and authors to share the story of their journey with dreams with my followers. It was so well received that I wanted to expand it into a regular series for my blog so more people would see it. The truth is, when we share our dreams and our experiences with dreaming, we inspire others. I shared how you can become an inspirational dreamer in the original post on June 17, 2015.

Today’s Inspirational Dreamer is…Teresa DeCicco!

Teresa DeCicco

Dr. Teresa DeCicco is a Professor of Psychology at Trent University in Canada as well as an Adjunct Professor at Queen’s University and a Research Associate at  both Guelph University and the Centre for National Research in Italy.  She has published numerous scientific papers on dreams, dreaming and spiritual psychology. We first met, though not in person, when we were the featured dream experts (along with Dave King) on the same television show, In Dreams. We finally met at one of the conferences for the International Association for the Study of Dreams and once we withdrew our projections on each other, lol, we clicked over the topic of spirit and dreams! Her latest book is Living Beyond the Five Senses.

Do you remember any of your childhood dreams? What’s the earliest?

I remember many dreams from childhood because my mother asked us over breakfast if we had had any dreams during the night. In essence, we were doing breakfast dreamwork but I did not realize this for many, many years. My mother paid attention to dreams, her own and ours, so this gave me the impression very early in life that they were important.

When did you first become interested in understanding your dreams?

I became interested in understanding dream meaning when I was a graduate student doing an internship at a cancer hospital in Canada. I was part of a program to help cancer patients cope with their illness but they kept wanting to share their dreams. I quickly came to realize that their dreams had important themes such as making meaning in their illness, progression of the illness, factors for recovery, and for some, imagery of transition to death. This became very profound and important for me to understand so that was the starting point for delving into the science of the dreaming mind.

You have just written a book “Living Beyond The Five Senses”. Did dreams play a role in your healing?

Dreaming is certainly a “Beyond the Five Senses Experience”. The dreaming mind has an incredible capacity to obtain information beyond the 5 senses and we certainly do not yet understand this great mystery. Dreams will provide information for problem-solving that cannot be had during waking day. Dreams will answer questions with incubation if a dreamer really wants to know the answer. Future events are foretold in dreams before they will occur in waking day, if a dreamer is willing to pay attention. The phenomena of dreaming is a rich and complex process that provides incredible information about waking life when we pay attention to our own dreams.

If you could give one piece of advice to those who are just starting to listen to their dreams, what would it be?

One piece of advice I would suggest is to begin keeping a dream journal and begin dream interpretation with any method of interest. Once we befriend our own dreaming mind it will begin to reveal its secrets and we will be given much information for waking life. In terms of understanding our dreams we can begin with any method that works for us. Over time we can add more methods and we can delve deeper into the process. Understanding our own dreaming mind is one of the greatest adventures available to us. This is one we just don’t want to miss!!

Find out more about Dr. DeCicco’s work at: www.livingbeyondthefivesenses.com and www.teresadecicco.org

Follow Dr. DeCicco’s blog: http://livingbeyondthefivesenses.com/2015/06/08/the-girl-next-door/

Are you ready to be an Inspirational Dreamer?

Inspirational Dreamers

Inspirational Dreamers July 16, 2015

Inspirational Dreamers

 

We are ALL “Inspirational Dreamers” who can share our dream stories! When I launched my blog on Facebook, I asked prominent dreamers and authors to share the story of their journey with dreams with my followers. It was so well received that I wanted to expand it into a regular series for my blog so more people would see it. The truth is, when we share our dreams and our experiences with dreaming, we inspire others. I’ll share how you can become an inspirational dreamer too from the original post on June 17, 2015. In the meantime, meet Robert …..

Robert Moss

Robert Moss describes himself as a dream teacher, on a path for which there has been no career track in our culture. He is the creator of Active Dreaming, an original synthesis of dreamwork and shamanism. Born in Australia, he survived three near-death experiences in childhood. He leads popular seminars all over the world, including a three-year training for teachers of Active Dreaming. A former lecturer in ancient history at the Australian National University, he is a best-selling novelist, journalist and independent scholar. His nine books on dreaming, shamanism and imagination include Conscious Dreaming, Dreamways of the Iroquois, The Dreamer’s Book of the Dead, The Three “”Only”” Things,The Secret History of Dreaming, Dreamgates, Active Dreaming and Dreaming the Soul Back Home: Shamanic Dreaming for Healing and Becoming Whole and his latest, Sidewalk Oracles: Playing with Signs, Symbols and Synchronicity in Everyday Life, to be released October 2015. I studied with Robert in his Dream Teacher Trainings and credit much of my shamanic experience to his training classes.

You created Active Dreaming, an original synthesis of dreamwork and shamanism that is now being taught and practiced in more than 20 countries. What is Active Dreaming? What is the life of a dream teacher like?

 Active Dreaming is my original synthesis of shamanism and contemporary dreamwork. It offers three core areas of practice.
First, Active Dreaming is a way of talking and walking our dreams, of bringing energy and guidance from the dreamworld into everyday life. We learn how to create a safe space where we can share dreams of the night and dreams of life with others, receive helpful feedback, and encourage each other to move towards creative and healing action. We discover that each of us can play guide for others. Above all, we learn to take action to embody the energy and guidance of our dreams in everyday life.
Second, Active Dreaming is a method of shamanic lucid dreaming.  It starts with simple everyday practice and extends to profound group experiences of time travel, soul recovery and the exploration of multidimensional reality. It is founded on the understanding that we don’t need to go to sleep in order to dream. The easiest way to become a conscious or lucid dreamer is to start out lucid and stay that way.
Third, Active Dreaming is a way of conscious living. It calls us to remember and tell and live our bigger story in such a way that it can be heard and received by others. It is about navigating by synchronicity and grasping that the energy we carry and the attitudes we choose have magnetic effect on the world around us, drawing or repelling encounters and circumstances.

What is my life as a dream teacher like? It is like being on one of the world’s best vacations every day. I travel and teach from Brazil to Bucharest, from Paris to Portland, and everywhere I have the joy of seeing the light come on in people’s eyes when they discover that there are fun, high-energy ways to play with their dreams and live their best dreams.

You say that we can all become “shamans of the breakfast table”. Tell us how!

Anyone who dreams, as the Kawahiv, an Amazonian dreaming people say, is “a little bit shaman”. We stand on the brink of claiming this power when we remember our dreams and start to develop the practice of working with dreams as daily practice. I have developed a fast, fun method of everyday dream sharing. I call this Lightning Dreamwork, because it is meant to be fast as a lightning bolt, and to focus and harness energy. What Lightning Dreamwork provides is a way of dream sharing that can reach temporary closure in just five or ten minutes, exploding any alibi that we don’t have time for this. This approach also offers clear guard rails that insure that we will not intrude on each other’s privacy and will never presume to tell another person what his or her dreams mean. The process always leads to creative or healing action to bring the energy and guidance of dreams into daily life.

You say that in dreaming we are all time travellers and this can become conscious practice. How?

As dreamers, we are time travellers. With or without intention, we travel to the past and the future as well as parallel worlds. This can become conscious practice, and we can learn to fold time in the sense of being present, mind to mind, with other personalities in other times, sharing gifts and insights with each other. Our ability to travel into the future is essential to our survival and well-being. We not only bring back memories of future events for which we – and sometimes whole communities – can then prepare. We visit possible futures, and our ability to read our memories of the possible future and then take appropriate action can determine whether we can escape a future event we don’t like, or manifest one that we want.
How? We start by recording and working with spontaneous night dreams. We learn to value the scout who goes out every night, in dreaming, to identify challenges and opportunities that lie ahead, and to work with his information. Every morning, he brings us memories of the future – and also glimpses of past times and parallel times.
Dream memories of this kind are ideal portals for conscious journeys – for which we use shamanic drumming in the workshops – to explore past, future, or parallel times. We can learn to go back to a younger self – as I went back to my strange, solitary boy self – to offer support and mentoring. We can visit our soul family and learn how the dramas of other lives in other times may be influencing our present lives.

You say that treasures await us in the Place between Sleep and Awake. What kind of treasures and how do we find them?

The easiest way to become a lucid or conscious dreamer is to spend more time in the twilight zone between waking and sleep, or between sleep and waking. Tinker Bell told Peter Pan to look for her in the Place between Sleep and Awake. This liminal state is a place of encounter with inner guides and transpersonal visitors. It is also a place of heightened psychic perception and creative breakthroughs, where it is easy to make connections that escape the daily mind.

BE INSPIRATIONAL

Become An Inspirational Dreamer!

Ok, maybe you haven’t written as many books about dreams as Robert Moss, but he has dream stories just as we all do. Dreaming is a experience we all share. Here are some ways you can inspire others. I’d love to hear about some ways you have inspired others so please post!

  • Share a dream– This is top on my list! The simple act of sharing a dream, connects you to others, gives you ideas and inspiration about your dream and your life and lets you know that you are perfectly normal, no matter how weird your dream images or storyline are.
  • Honour your dream– Do something in your waking world to keep the message of your dream alive and well. It is so easy to forget a dream and its details and it’s just as easy to watch your insights evaporate into thin air. When we honour a dream- Putting post-it notes with the dream’s message on your computer’s monitor, doodling the images in the dream, writing a poem (+ millions of other creative possibilities) keeps the dream’s insights within reach of your conscious mind. And when it is in your awareness, that is the point of change. Transformation becomes doable.
  • Call someone who just appeared in your dream- and say “Hey, I just dreamt about you!” Not only does it teach the listener that you value your dreams (and they can too) but it also says “I care”. Heart-Centered Dreamwork starts with a caring heart. Most likely that person appeared in your dream as a symbol or a projection of an aspect of yourself, so you don’t have to get too worked up imagining the dream is a precognitive message for them, just go with the synchronicity and have fun comparing notes. You never know but that person might have been dreaming about you too!
  • Share what you learn. By now, you’ve probably read a lot of blogs on dreams, maybe even several books. Talk about what you’ve learned with your friends, as you continue to share dreams. You might even want to lead a dream group for your friends or advertise a new dream group in the community. Before you know it friends and colleagues will be telling you their dreams and you will be known as an inspirational dreamer!

Not sure where to start? The International Association for the Study of Dreams is it! The only organization of its kind, IASD welcomes dreamers of all levels, whether novice “lay” dreamer or experienced professional in the field and everything in between. Their annual conferences are magical, educational and inspirational. Check them out at www.asdreams.org.

 

Robert Moss can be reached through his website: http://www.mossdreams.com/index.html where you can also access information about his courses and follow his blog.

 

 

 

 

 

Inspirational Dreamers-Sharing Our Dream Stories

Blog Inspirational Dreamers July 6, 2015

Inspirational Dreamers (2) copy

 

We are ALL “inspirational dreamers”! When I launched my blog on Facebook, I asked prominent dreamers and authors to share the story of their journey with dreams with my followers. It was so well received that I wanted to expand it into a regular series for my blog so more people would see it. The truth is, when we share our dreams and our experiences with dreaming, we inspire others. To see how you can inspire others scroll down to the first post from June 17, 2015 on the topic. In the meantime, meet Jean …..

Jean Campbell

This week’s Inspirational Dreamer is Jean Campbell. Jean is a pioneer in Consciousness Studies, CEO of The iMAGE Project, founder of The World Dreams Peace Bridge, and 2006-2007 President of the International Association for the Study of Dreams. Her latest book, Group Dreaming: Dreams to the Tenth Power was published in 2006. Jean was gracious enough to appear on my radio show Dream Investigator and is a source of energy, light, laughter and wisdom at every IASD conference! (Plus we share a love of Jane Roberts’ The Nature of Personal Reality!)

 

Do you remember any childhood dreams? If so, what’s the earliest?

I recalled my first dream at age four, a lucid dream of flying down the stairs in my childhood home.  It was so much fun that I did it all night long.  Unfortunately, when I told my family that I’d spent the night flying down the stairs “and I didn’t even hurt myself,” they laughed and told me it was “just a dream.  I did not recall another dream until I was in my twenties.

When did you first get interested in understanding your dreams? How did that unfold for you?

Before the dreams mentioned above, I had begun to read Carl Jung and Edgar Cayce, sparking my interest in altered states of consciousness.  In quick succession, one night, I had three dreams involving archetypes so irresistible to me that I simply had to discover what they meant.

How did dreams play a role in your life, whether in decision making or in healing?

By the time I became Director of the Poseidia Institute in Virginia Beach in my early thirties, I had learned a fair amount about dream work; however, faced with the question of how to get people interested in a nonprofit organization dealing with consciousness studies I quickly caught on to the idea that dreams are the one “altered state of consciousness” all people share. and most people are comfortable to explore.  That led to my first book Dreams Beyond Dreaming, published in 1981.  Even though this was just at the very beginning of the current popular interest in dreams and dreaming, it was clear to me from the public response to that book that people were eager to understand more about dreams.

If you could give one piece of advice to those who are just starting to listen to their dreams, what would it be?

The dream work technique I teach and facilitate is called DreamWork/BodyWork because it involves working with the dream with the entire body, not just the logical mind.  Something indicated by recent research in psychotherapy is that “talk therapy” does not work as well with survivors of trauma (and the statistics on trauma are devastating) as nonverbal and creative techniques tend to work.  Also true is that studies on learning demonstrate that movement assists assimilation of information.  My advice then, in working with dreams of any type, is to feel the dream by moving through it in some way (walking, dancing, drawing, gestalt…)  And find some friends to do it with.

Anything else you’d like to share about dreams?

You might be interested in the activities of the World Dreams Peace Bridge, an international group I founded in 2001 (www.worlddreamspeacebridge.org)  On July 2nd, 2015 the Peace Bridge invited all dreamers to join us for Drum Dance and Dream for Peace both at the 5th World Children’s Festival on the National Ellipse in Washington, DC, but also globally.  See our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Drum-Dance-and-Dream-for-Peace/189189004426632 for more information.

 

Inspirational Dreamers

Inspirational Dreamers June 17, 2015

Inspirational Dreamers


When you dream, you are not alone. Other inspirational dreamers hold out their hand to steady you along the way. Dreaming, we tap into the collective unconscious, and many layers of our dream’s meanings can be attributed to the group energy of our family, our community, our culture and society, and our world. So why then, do people think they are alone when they dream with the story going on in their head? Today, I’m going to show you how you can connect with other dreamers, be inspired by them, and how you can become an inspiring dreamer for others! Tall order, I know but very doable. PLUS… This is the first in a series on inspirational dreamers. It is my hope that you will see your dreams in their own exploration and know that you, too, can inspire others!

As you might imagine, I have a lot of books on the topic of dreams and I’ve been keenly studying dreams for about 25 years and I have never come across an author on the subject of dreams, that wasn’t first fascinated by his or her own dreams! So many dreamers think they are alone, until they share a dream with another person. When we share a dream, we find themes in common (teeth falling out dreams, chase dreams, naked in public dreams, unable to call for help dreams and so many more shared themes) and we begin to connect heart-to-heart with other dreamers. The moment you share a dream with another caring and respectful dreamer, not only do you find yourself relaxing in the knowledge that you are normal, but the one you share the dream with has an opportunity to offer you valuable insights that you might not see for yourself. In this way, one dream at a time, we create connections between dreamers-even if they never met before- that enable us to see the light and the humanity in each other. All that from sharing your dream!

I was first inspired by Jeremy Taylor’s book, Where People Fly and Water Runs Uphill, when I first came across it in 1997. It is still in print and republished and updated as The Wisdom of Your Dreams. As I read through it, I knew I would be running dream groups, despite the knot in my stomach. (That always happens and is my signal that the Universe is about to take me kicking and screaming down the next path!) But it was all good and 18 years later, I’m still running dream groups….thanks to Jeremy Taylor!

Jeremy Taylor

Jeremy Taylor

 

 

Reverend Dr. Jeremy Taylor, D.Min., S.Th.D. (hon.) is Co-founder and Past President of the International Association for the Study of Dreams (IASD), Founder-Director of the Marin Institute for Projective Dream Work (MIPD), Founding Faculty at the Chaplaincy Institute for Interfaith and Arts Ministries (ChI), Member of the Board of the Unitarian Universalist Society for Community Ministries (UUSCM)

Do you remember any childhood dreams? If so, what’s the earliest?

One of the earliest dreams I remember – perhaps I was five years old? – was of  seeing an elaborate toy castle filled with exquisitely detailed Walt Disney character “action figures.” I was so excited, (and as it turned out, it was a dream that changed my life!) I woke up, filled with curiosity and boundless enthusiasm, and dashed off to tell it to my grandmother, whom at that time I actually believed knew everything… She listened to me tell the dream, smiled kindly, and said, “Oh, honey! It’s a dream – it doesn’t mean anything…!”

…and I was SO SHOCKED! I didn’t know what it meant – but I knew it meant SOMETHING! it was at that moment, that “the dominoes fell,” and I realized, consciously for the first time: “… If she’s wrong about THIS, what else may she be wrong about…?!”

I still remember it as the moment that I decided consciously, “… Wow! I’m going to have to take full responsibility for what I believe and what I know myself… I really can’t rely on the adults around me to tell me what’s true – no matter how smart and kind they are, or how much I love them, or how much they love me…” It was a profoundly shocking realization…

It was perhaps a little early in life to come to such a conclusion, but now, in my 70s, I still rely on my own conscience, and my own direct experience and evolving awareness – rather than other people’s beliefs and opinions – as the only reliable touchstone for what is true in my life.

When did you first get interested in understanding your dreams? How did that unfold for you?

As the above story suggests, I have been deeply interested in the multiple meanings and implications of my own and other people’s dreams for as long as I can remember. That interest has only deepened and grown over the decades. It is an interest that is stimulated, and to some extent satisfied, every time I remember and contemplate my own dreams, and also when I hear, see, read dream accounts and come in contact with “dream inspired” art and other expressions from other people. In fact, “projective archetypal dream work” became and remains the center of my professional, spiritual, and personal/creative life.

What role have dreams played for you in your life?

Deepening and extending my understanding and appreciation of, and my ability to give some sort of expression to my dreams in the waking world, as well as helping others to do the same, has become the main organizing principle of my life.

I have written several books about dreams and dreaming from this evolving perspective, (all of which are available online, in bricks & mortar bookstores, and through my website, www.jeremytaylor.com).

I am one of the original four founders of the International Association for the Study of Dreams, (IASD), along with Strephon Williams, Gayle Delaney, and Patricia Garfield. You can find out more about this exemplary organization at www.asdreams.org. I also operate a professional training and certification program for dream workers, the Marin Institute for Projective Dream Work, (MIPD). I also work one-to-one, and in larger gatherings, with dreamers all over the world – all of which which may also be perused in more detail and arranged through my website, www.jeremytaylor.com.

If you could give one piece of advice to those who are just starting to listen to their dreams would it be?

The single most important piece of practical advice to keep in mind about remembering and looking at dreams, (particularly your own dreams!), is that they always carry MULTIPLE meanings and implications – (no matter how obvious any one meaning or implication may appear to be upon first encounter). Everything in our dreams, (and I now believe in our waking lives as well!), always has multiple, often confusing, (sometimes even seemingly contradictory), meanings and implications.

The hardest thing for anyone to do is to see his/her own dreams clearly with “fresh eyes.” The original dreamer is the only one who can say with any certainty what his or her dreams may actually mean, but in solitude, without the ideas and projections of other people, each of us will remain uniquely and selectively blind to the deeper meanings and multiple gifts of our own dreams. This unique and selective blindness is particularly difficult to overcome with regard to our, (seemingly unquestionable!) emotions in the dream world. Ultimately, there is no more reason to take the emotions we experience in dreams exclusively literally then there is to take any other element of the dream literally.

That may not sound like more than “one piece of advice” but all of these points mentioned above are profoundly interrelated consequences of the one great truth about dreams: ALL DREAMS – EVEN THE WORST, SWEAT-POPPING, GUT-WRENCHING NIGHTMARES –  COME IN THE SERVICE OF HEALTH AND WHOLENESS, AND SPEAK A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF METAPHOR AND SYMBOL.

Another way of saying the same thing is that “the Magic Mirror (of dreams) never lies!”

 

4 Simple and Brilliant Ways You Can Become an Inspirational Dreamer Too!

BE INSPIRATIONAL

Jeremy Taylors stories are both inspirational and similar to yours, right? Ok, maybe you haven’t written a book about your dreams, but he has the same dream stories just as we all do. Dreaming is a experience we all share. Here are some ways you can inspire others. I’d love to hear about some ways you have inspired others so please post!

  • Share a dream– This is top on my list! The simple act of sharing a dream, connects you to others, gives you ideas and inspiration about your dream and your life and lets you know that you are perfectly normal, no matter how weird your dream images or storyline are.
  • Honour your dream– Do something in your waking world to keep the message of your dream alive and well. It is so easy to forget a dream and its details and it’s just as easy to watch your insights evaporate into thin air. When we honour a dream- Putting post-it notes with the dream’s message on your computer’s monitor, doodling the images in the dream, writing a poem (+ millions of other creative possibilities) keeps the dream’s insights within reach of your conscious mind. And when it is in your awareness, that is the point of change. Transformation becomes doable.
  • Call someone who just appeared in your dream- and say “Hey, I just dreamt about you!” Not only does it teach the listener that you value your dreams (and they can too) but it also says “I care”. Heart-Centered Dreamwork starts with a caring heart. Most likely that person appeared in your dream as a symbol or a projection of an aspect of yourself, so you don’t have to get too worked up imagining the dream is a precognitive message for them, just go with the synchronicity and have fun comparing notes. You never know but that person might have been dreaming about you too!
  • Share what you learn. By now, you’ve probably read a lot of blogs on dreams, maybe even several books. Talk about what you’ve learned with your friends, as you continue to share dreams. You might even want to lead a dream group for your friends or advertise a new dream group in the community. Before you know it friends and colleagues will be telling you their dreams and you will be known as an inspirational dreamer!

Not sure where to start? The International Association for the Study of Dreams is it! The only organization of its kind, IASD welcomes dreamers of all levels, whether novice “lay” dreamer or experienced professional in the field and everything in between. Their annual conferences are magical, educational and inspirational. Check them out at www.asdreams.org.